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STORIES FROM AROUND TOWN
 

We're always amazed when we hear someone say, "Oh, no one wants to hear what I've got to say."

 

And do you know what we say to that. "Uh, yes they do."  Especially in 10 years, or 20 or 30 or 100. That's how we know what happened in 1776. In 1900. In 1955. Pick a year, any year.

 

The problem is people think they don't know how to start. And we say to that, just pick up a pen and write. Don't worry about having it "sound" just right. The point is that you've started.  Write some more. Maybe it's 3 sentences. Maybe it's 3 paragraphs. Maybe you got the groove going and you write 3 pages. Just write it down, let if flow.

 

Maybe it's just a short little memory. About the time you spent sitting at the counter of Burg's Drug Store. Or how you used to take the shortcut through the peat bog to get to school.  Maybe it's from 1930 or maybe 1960. Maybe it's the story your grandma used to tell you about how they produced everything they needed on their farm and only came to town once a month. Or the time your grandpa won the Brothers of the Brush beard contest.

 

Send us your story!


Email: ChelseaHistoryPR@gmail.com
Or click here!

STORIES FROM AROUND TOWN
 

We're always amazed when we hear someone say, "Oh, no one wants to hear what I've got to say."

 

And do you know what we say to that. "Uh, yes they do."  Especially in 10 years, or 20 or 30 or 100. That's how we know what happened in 1776. In 1900. In 1955. Pick a year, any year.

 

The problem is people think they don't know how to start. And we say to that, just pick up a pen and write. Don't worry about having it "sound" just right. The point is that you've started.  Write some more. Maybe it's 3 sentences. Maybe it's 3 paragraphs. Maybe you got the groove going and you write 3 pages. Just write it down, let if flow.

 

Maybe it's just a short little memory. About the time you spent sitting at the counter of Burg's Drug Store. Or how you used to take the shortcut through the peat bog to get to school.  Or how you used to walk across town to go ice skating but by the time you got there and laced up your skates, you were freezing and ready to go home! Maybe it's from 1930 or maybe 1960. Maybe it's the story your grandma used to tell you about how they produced everything they needed on their farm and only came to town once a month. Or the time your grandpa won the Brothers of the Brush beard contest. Tell us!

Send us your story!


Email: ChelseaHistoryPR@gmail.com
Or click here!

Growing up in the 1960s and '70s
By Kathleen Treado Daniels

My family moved to Chelsea  from Marquette in 1964. We moved here because my father was transferred to Camp Waterloo, he was an administrator there.

 

His goal was to move back to Marquette to become the prison warden.

 

We loved growing up in the downtown area. First we lived in a house on Main Street, eventually the house was torn down to make way for the Chelsea State Bank(it was originally where the Court building is today). Across the alley was Dr. Bruce Stubbs and his family.The Stubbs house was saved and a big town happening was when their house as well as The George Palmer house, was moved down Main Street to their new locations. The Stubbs house resides at McKinley Street and the Palmer house ,on AD Mayer drive.

My family of 7 -- our parents, and Howard C. Treado,’71, Reatha Treado Tweedie,’ 73, Tim Treado, ‘74, Anne Mann,’75, and me class of ‘77 , moved off Main Street onto South Street, where my mother Daph still resides.

We lived on our bikes and on the swing sets of St. Mary school.We loved grabbing before school treats at Kuesters and picking up after school potato chips and dip at Schneider’s.

I spent so much time playing down the hill on Chandler Street with Diane Burg, and Kim Dresch as well as playing “all neighborhood” games of hide and seek and kick the can.

When the Robert Powers family moved to town, they rented the Barlow home on South Street(another home moved to another location the green and pink Victorian on W.Middle St.)and their family of 9 became part of our family.  I became fast friends with Judy Powers Cavanaugh, to have a buddy kitty corner from my house was awesome. My sister Anne and I spent so much of our lives at the Frisbie house on Madison St. with our dear friends Susan Kay Bauer, and Cindy Frisbie Gauss.

We’d take the bus to Tamarack to swim in Clear lake for the afternoon.My love for singing old camp songs comes from those bus rides. The snake dances and bonfires before Homecoming football games, on Thursday nights were beyond breathtaking for an elementary school kid,no parents involved,only older siblings and the cheerleaders and football players who I had crushes on all!!!

Our father died on Homecoming morning in 1969, on a cold and rainy day. He was 38. We stayed in Chelsea because our life was entrenched in good friends  who made it and easier for our mother to stay. We were blessed with great friends from our ST. Mary family. The Merkels, the Powers, The Thomsons...

I can’t forget to add...I was in track during Junior high and high school our coach was DiAnn L'Roy, and I was a cheerleader and I was in many Chelsea musicals( helmed by the multi talented  DiAnn LRoy)for many years. I had a crush on my husband during those musicals. He never knew that until years later.

We married , lived in NYC, and after our first child was born in 84, we decided to raise our family in Chelsea. We moved back to town in ‘86.

We loved our upbringing. So 3 kids and grandkids, Chelsea is still our home.

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Staffan Family Rocking Horse, c. 1900
By Diane Borton Alexander

Stephanie (Sis) Wagner Kanten said that her great-grandfather (Frank Staffan - carpenter/undertaker) made the rocking horse. I believe it came from her mother who was Katie Staffan Wagner.  I was fortunate to get it and keep it in the Chelsea family by donating it to the Chelsea Historical Museum. I've had it since Sis passed away in 2010, keeping her memory close for Joanne Staffan Ingles and me.

Frank Staffan Bio

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The Iconic Cavanaugh Lake Steamer
By Jan Bernath

 

Part of the mythology of Chelsea includes the boat that my father, Lewie Bernath, built for Lloyd Heydlauff in 1940. Here is a picture I took of him many years later when he was in his 80s.

 

The story goes that there was a line of cars back towards town to see if it is would float.  Obviously, it did!

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Caroline "Carrie" Vogel

 

Mike Maroney is the historian for his family - THE PLIENINGEN VOGELS. Originally compiled in January 1958 by Karl Vogel, additional notes were made by Paul Maroney in the 1970-80s, by Dan Maroney in the 1990s-2000s, and by Mike Maroney in the 2020s. Here's one tiny snippet of the family's wonderfully complex and thorough compilation! Thanks to Mike Maroney for sharing!

CAROLINA “CARRIE” VOGEL, the second child of Israel Vogel was born September 25,1867 and died in 1941. She married Clarence Maroney in 189l. Her entire life was spent in Chelsea, Michigan, and she is buried there in The Oak Grove Cemetery. "Carrie" Vogel, as she was known to all her friends, was unquestionably the village belle during her girlhood days and she had all that was needed to win the title. She was a beautiful girl, wonderfully proportioned, vivacious, active, possessed of boundless health and energy, full of fun, and of a friendly and cooperative nature except in the morning.

Before her marriage in 1891 she was a popular and efficient saleslady in George Kempf's Dry Goods Store on North Main Street in Chelsea. After her marriage, she lived the rest of her life in what had been the Davidson home at the corner of Railroad and McKinley Streets in Chelsea, one of the oldest houses in town that Clarence remodeled by the addition of a large porch, a number of large plate glass windows, and other alterations making it into a large and attractive, comfortable home that occupied a large corner lot.

Carrie was a great lover of flowers, and her large and well-tended garden contained many well grown varieties, including a host of many different oriental poppies, all lovely. She was a talented mimic, and in later life she delighted in dressing up and impersonating many characters to the delight of the children, my own included, whenever they visited her.

She was a member of the Eastern Star, in which organization she held many offices down through the years. She was an early member of the Cythererians, a ladies group that included all of the first ladies of the village in its membership; and she and the members of her family were lifelong members of the Congregational Church.

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John Strahle - Civil War Vet

By Shawn Personke

 

It's so interesting to find out who lived in your house throughout the decades. Our research found that John Strahle - the longest living Civil War vet - lived in our house for over 10 years, purchasing it from the Kantlehner family, who originally built it  around 1910. Strahle and his daughter Carrie moved here after his wife Sophie died,  John died in 1929. Since he died at the start of the depression, we surmised that the house ownership/occupation was in limbo for a couple of years until it was bought by the Groves, who started the "5 &10" in downtown Chelsea. We often imagined  them walking uptown to open their store, or do some other business.  These stories are just one of the many that can be found in the digitized "Chelsea Standard" archives housed by the Chelsea District Library.  

 

Photo: A vintage postcard  - looking south on South Main, from about where Cottage Inn now operates.

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